• December 3, 2009 at 3:00 pm

    Hi everyone!

    My name is Randy and I’m very new to this forum. I am attempting to understand this question because I have been offered an opportunity to take care of someone part-time who suffers from dementia. Perhaps my question is not appropriate for discussion on this forum. If so, I apologize.

    However, if it is condign to this forum, I would appreciate any input or feedback from those who work in the field as paid care givers. I am a non-family member, not part of any agency, and have very little training or experience in this matter.

    The person in question is 89 yrs old and her four daughters are offering me this opportunity. I am a college student (of non-traditional age) who rents the basement of one sister. The 89 yr old mother who suffers from dementia will move in to the same sister’s home (where I currently reside) on January 1. At present, the family requires a four month commitment on my part to make this opportunity feasible.

    I am attempting to understand the various aspects of this opportunity from both a medical and legal point of view. So if this forum welcomes it, I have many questions as part of my research into this matter. Perhaps I’m biting off more than I can chew and should decline this opportunity. Perhaps the family would be better served by hiring an agency.

    Perhaps this thread may need to be moved or disallowed pending the decision of forum administration.

    thanks for your patience and understanding!

    Randy

  • December 5, 2009 at 6:48 am

    Dude I am not sure if you would want to live in the basement with a demented person upstairs unless there is some one up there with her.Or you set up monitors so you can see her every move and hear everything. For instance what if she forgets something on the stove and catches the house on fire while you are asleep in the basement.Can you get out of the basement with the house on fire? It depends on the mental abilities of the patient.Some would be the loving grandma that needs a little help every now and then and others might be figuring a way to get rid of you in the middle of the night….ya never know what kind of demented person you are getting until you get one.
    Dementia is the basic term for ‘loss of memory’ and other mental abilities severe enough to interfere with daily living. It is caused by physical changes in the brain. Alzheimer’s disease is the most common type of dementia,accounting for 50 to 70 percent of cases.
    Go to this site to see the different types of dementia.
    http://www.alzinfo.org/understanding-dementia.asp
    Go to this site to understand Alzheimer’s type of dementia.
    http://www.alzinfo.org/understanding-alzheimers-disease.asp
    Go to this site and read the Alzheimer’s Disease Bill of Rights
    and the Carepartner’s Bill of Rights and The 10 Absolutes.
    http://www.simplesite.com/Marcus/8714668
    Any questions … just ask.

  • December 15, 2009 at 6:11 pm

    Here’s a link to another quite helpful article on “The Big Four” neurological disorders. (Also available in pdf format at the site.)

    http://journals.lww.com/neurologynow/Fulltext/2009/05060/The__Other__Dementias.14.aspx

    😉
    Jim

  • January 5, 2011 at 7:06 am

    @rhermen wrote:

    Hi everyone!

    My name is Randy and I’m very new to this forum. I am attempting to understand this question because I have been offered an opportunity to take care of someone part-time who suffers from dementia. Perhaps my question is not appropriate for discussion on this forum. If so, I apologize.

    However, if it is condign to this forum, I would appreciate any input or feedback from those who work in the field as paid care givers. I am a non-family member, not part of any agency, and have very little training or experience in this matter.

    The person in question is 89 yrs old and her four daughters are offering me this opportunity. I am a college student (of non-traditional age) who rents the basement of one sister. The 89 yr old mother who suffers from dementia will move in to the same sister’s home (where I currently reside) on January 1. At present, the family requires a four month commitment on my part to make this opportunity feasible.

    I am attempting to understand the various aspects of this opportunity from both a medical and legal point of view. So if this forum welcomes it, I have many questions as part of my research into this matter. Perhaps I’m biting off more than I can chew and should decline this opportunity. Perhaps the family would be better served by hiring an agency.

    Perhaps this thread may need to be moved or disallowed pending the decision of forum administration.

    thanks for your patience and understanding!

    Randy

    Actually, Iam not understanding your question of what are you asking. But I think you want to know about care givers. I have a sister works in supports of the patients. so, I have taken the idea from her about how to give support to the dementia patient. the various steps to follow are:-
    1)Speak slowly and clearly so that she understands easily .
    2)when you give instructions to the dementia patient, then give one by one instruction because they may forget what they were listening.
    3)They may forget what they were saying
    4)To ensure that the room is light so that your face can be seen.

  • January 5, 2011 at 7:25 am

    @rhermen wrote:

    Hi everyone!

    My name is Randy and I’m very new to this forum. I am attempting to understand this question because I have been offered an opportunity to take care of someone part-time who suffers from dementia. Perhaps my question is not appropriate for discussion on this forum. If so, I apologize.

    However, if it is condign to this forum, I would appreciate any input or feedback from those who work in the field as paid care givers. I am a non-family member, not part of any agency, and have very little training or experience in this matter.

    The person in question is 89 yrs old and her four daughters are offering me this opportunity. I am a college student (of non-traditional age) who rents the basement of one sister. The 89 yr old mother who suffers from dementia will move in to the same sister’s home (where I currently reside) on January 1. At present, the family requires a four month commitment on my part to make this opportunity feasible.

    I am attempting to understand the various aspects of this opportunity from both a medical and legal point of view. So if this forum welcomes it, I have many questions as part of my research into this matter. Perhaps I’m biting off more than I can chew and should decline this opportunity. Perhaps the family would be better served by hiring an agency.

    Perhaps this thread may need to be moved or disallowed pending the decision of forum administration.

    thanks for your patience and understanding!

    Randy

    Actually, Iam not understanding your question of what are you asking. But I think you want to know about care givers. I have a sister works in supports of the patients. so, I have taken the idea from her about how to give support to the dementia patient. the various steps to follow are:-
    1)Speak slowly and clearly so that she understands easily .
    2)when you give instructions to the dementia patient, then give one by one instruction because they may forget what they were listening.
    3)They may forget what they were saying
    4)To ensure that the room is light so that your face can be seen.

  • January 5, 2011 at 7:26 am

    @rhermen wrote:

    Hi everyone!

    My name is Randy and I’m very new to this forum. I am attempting to understand this question because I have been offered an opportunity to take care of someone part-time who suffers from dementia. Perhaps my question is not appropriate for discussion on this forum. If so, I apologize.

    However, if it is condign to this forum, I would appreciate any input or feedback from those who work in the field as paid care givers. I am a non-family member, not part of any agency, and have very little training or experience in this matter.

    The person in question is 89 yrs old and her four daughters are offering me this opportunity. I am a college student (of non-traditional age) who rents the basement of one sister. The 89 yr old mother who suffers from dementia will move in to the same sister’s home (where I currently reside) on January 1. At present, the family requires a four month commitment on my part to make this opportunity feasible.

    I am attempting to understand the various aspects of this opportunity from both a medical and legal point of view. So if this forum welcomes it, I have many questions as part of my research into this matter. Perhaps I’m biting off more than I can chew and should decline this opportunity. Perhaps the family would be better served by hiring an agency.

    Perhaps this thread may need to be moved or disallowed pending the decision of forum administration.

    thanks for your patience and understanding!

    Randy

    Actually, Iam not understanding your question of what are you asking. But I think you want to know about care givers. I have a sister works in supports of the patients. so, I have taken the idea from her about how to give support to the dementia patient. the various steps to follow are:-
    1)Speak slowly and clearly so that she understands easily .
    2)when you give instructions to the dementia patient, then give one by one instruction because they may forget what they were listening.
    3)They may forget what they were saying
    4)To ensure that the room is light so that your face can be seen.

  • January 5, 2011 at 7:54 am

    @rhermen wrote:

    Hi everyone!

    My name is Randy and I’m very new to this forum. I am attempting to understand this question because I have been offered an opportunity to take care of someone part-time who suffers from dementia. Perhaps my question is not appropriate for discussion on this forum. If so, I apologize.

    However, if it is condign to this forum, I would appreciate any input or feedback from those who work in the field as paid care givers. I am a non-family member, not part of any agency, and have very little training or experience in this matter.

    The person in question is 89 yrs old and her four daughters are offering me this opportunity. I am a college student (of non-traditional age) who rents the basement of one sister. The 89 yr old mother who suffers from dementia will move in to the same sister’s home (where I currently reside) on January 1. At present, the family requires a four month commitment on my part to make this opportunity feasible.

    I am attempting to understand the various aspects of this opportunity from both a medical and legal point of view. So if this forum welcomes it, I have many questions as part of my research into this matter. Perhaps I’m biting off more than I can chew and should decline this opportunity. Perhaps the family would be better served by hiring an agency.

    Perhaps this thread may need to be moved or disallowed pending the decision of forum administration.

    thanks for your patience and understanding!

    Randy

    Actually, Iam not understanding your question of what are you asking. But I think you want to know about care givers. I have a sister works in supports of the patients. so, I have taken the idea from her about how to give support to the dementia patient. the various steps to follow are:-
    1)Speak slowly and clearly so that she understands easily .
    2)when you give instructions to the dementia patient, then give one by one instruction because they may forget what they were listening.
    3)They may forget what they were saying
    4)To ensure that the room is light so that your face can be seen.

  • May 17, 2016 at 2:52 am

    When a person is diagnosed with dementia, they are being diagnosed with a set of symptoms. This is similar to someone who has a sore throat. Their throat is sore but it is not known what is causing that particular symptom. It could be allergies, strep throat, or a common cold. Similarly, when someone has dementia they are experiencing symptoms without being told what is causing those symptoms.

    Another major difference between the two is that Alzheimer’s is not a reversible disease. It is degenerative and incurable at this time. Some forms of dementia, such as a drug interaction or a vitamin deficiency, are actually reversible or temporary.

    Once a cause of dementia is found appropriate treatment and counseling can begin. Until a proper diagnosis is made, the best approach to any dementia is engagement, communication and loving care.