• May 25, 2008 at 9:45 am

    I was told when my Mom came down with Altz. that medicaid could look back 5 yrs. I had her in a private facility for the last 2 yrs. but realized she doesn’t have enough to get past the look-back. I took her in 2 mons. ago to care for her in my home. This is the hardest challenge I ever face! The drs. gave her lorazepam for nerves but it doesn’t seem to help. I just want to make sure she has enough funds for the rest of her journey. Is anyone else in this situation? ❓

  • May 25, 2008 at 8:56 pm

    No—I’m not in your situation…but…Suspect that sooner or later most of us will find themselves there.

    Are you certain that your mother application would be turned down because of events that would be made obvious during the 5 year look back period? I may be wrong…but…I heard that NJ was relatively easy in their criteria. Why don’t you at least speak to a social worker? You might come away with some information about other programs that could help.

    I’d be tempted to apply for Medicaid and see what happens… Knowing what you are up against is better than worrying.

  • May 26, 2008 at 11:20 am

    Thanks, I was NJ was one of the hardest! I do know I’m having trouble with money. A lot of places want 24 to 30 mons. up front to have them as pateints going onto medicaid eventually

  • June 13, 2008 at 6:01 pm

    Dear Cool,

    I too am just starting to ask questions about the “look back” period. When does it start? I’ve heard, ‘when you enter the nursing home’, also, ‘when you apply for Medicaid’. What happens when Medicaid does look back? If you moved money, for example, 2 years ago, do they just add that to the PWD assets, or are you peanalized for moving the money?

    Also, if you start out in an assisted living facility, and you know they accept Medicaid patients, are they required to keep you as a patient or can they refuse treatment if you do not private pay?

    I have ton’s of questions regarding this process, in the state of Indiana in particular, and would like to know if there is a website or publication that will outline how it all works.

    My sister and I have considered taking Mother in our homes, but based on pleas for help such as your’s, I think we better think long and hard about going that route. My heart goes out to you. Having this disease in the family is hard enough without having to live it 24-7 in your home.

  • June 13, 2008 at 8:03 pm

    I went to various estate planners who all gave me different approaches to this… that’s why I’m so confused! The new look-back.. is now 5 yrs. They check to see if you moved money from your parents account and what assets they have. I’ve kept everthing above the board, but I don’t want to give medicaid all of my inheritance, I think that’s robbery! If they find something out of line, they can penalize you 5 or 6k a month, from what I’m told. If your parent is in a medicaid approved facility, they should know also from past clients. It seems that in NJ it’s hard to find the right answers ❓

  • August 23, 2008 at 8:09 pm

    Hi,
    I had seen your information same situation happened to me but not to my mom it was to my friend As got polio we had taken him various doctors but of no use.Totally money completed but his leg has no change.He is trouble in life as he cant run or walk with out a support

    ==================

    jones9985

    for information on Drug Addiction

    New Jersey Drug Addiction

  • November 15, 2008 at 5:49 am

    Hi,

    I’m an Elder Law attorney in California and Texas. Although each state has its own application of medicaid rules, there are some similarities.

    Due to the Deficit Reduction Act (signed in 2006), the rules have become more complex. In general, Medicaid will now look at all transfers that took place for 5 years (the look back period). However, the penalty period will not start to run until a person is in the nursing home and in need of medicaid. In other words, if someone gave away say $50,000 2 years ago thinking they would qualify for medicaid, the state Medicaid agency has the ability to look back at that transfer and apply a penalty period once the person needs nursing home care.

    Another big factor these days is something called “Estate Recovery.” Medicaid has the ability to pay itself back when it has provided money for someone in a nursing home. This is commonly done by going after the biggest asset someone has-their home. There are ways to protect the home, but you need to really plan all of this, and plan early.

    There are many things that can be done to plan and protect income and assets, but the key is always plan early. With that said, even a person facing a near term nursing home stay may have options.

    Feel free to ask me specific questions and I’ll try to point you in the right direction.

    Also, I have a website that will provide you will on-going articles and tips related to medicaid, veterans benefits planning, caregiver tips etc.

    That site is http://www.PayingForAlzheimersCare.com

    Warmly,

    Brian Willie

  • April 10, 2010 at 4:51 am

    A benefit is a health care service or supply that is paid for in part or in full by Medicare. There are substantial uncovered costs that a supplemental policy can help with.
    It is important for you to understand that Medicare does not cover everything, and it does not pay the total cost for most services or supplies that are covered.If the Medicare Part B was compared to an average insurance policy of the same cost, would one expect part B to be more deficient of coverage Part B covers doctors visits and outpatient care.
    http://medicarenewsline.com/

  • April 10, 2010 at 4:52 am

    A benefit is a health care service or supply that is paid for in part or in full by Medicare. There are substantial uncovered costs that a supplemental policy can help with.
    It is important for you to understand that Medicare does not cover everything, and it does not pay the total cost for most services or supplies that are covered.If the Medicare Part B was compared to an average insurance policy of the same cost, would one expect part B to be more deficient of coverage Part B covers doctors visits and outpatient care.
    http://medicarenewsline.com/