• March 12, 2009 at 8:47 pm

    I CARE FOR MY GRANDMOTHER THAT IS 82.WITH THE ALZHEIMERS SHE DOES REALLY WEIRD THINGS. SHE NEVER WAS A BITTER PERSON SHE WAS A LOVING LADY, WHEN I TRY TO HELP HER WITH SHOWERS SHE CALLES ME EVERY NAMEIN THE BOOK, AND I DONT UNDERSTAND IT. THERE WAS ONE DAY WHEN THE CAT BROUGHT IN A DEAD BIRD AND MY GRANDMOTHER PICKED IT UP AND PUT IT IN HER BED AND SAID IT WAS SLEEPING. DOES ANYBODY ELESE EXPERIANCE THINGS LIKE THIS? SHE INSISTS ON MAKING BREAKFAST SHE GETS UP AT 5 IN THE MORNING BUT I DONT TRUST HER BECAUSE SHE WASTE THE FOOD .[/b]

  • March 14, 2009 at 5:11 am

    Bathing!
    Bathing is one of the most difficult tasks a person faces when
    caring for a loved one with Alzheimer’s. Not only can the process
    be uncomfortable for a caregiver, because they may have never seen
    their loved one naked before, but it can also be a frightening and
    threatening experience for someone who suffers from Alzheimer’s.
    Feeling exposed, he or she may scream or become physical if they
    can’t remember why they need to bathe or feel uncomfortable being
    cold or undressed in front of another person.

    Before you bathe your loved one, take note of what abilities they
    do have so they can complete as much of the process as possible by
    themselves. Prepare the bathroom in advance by gathering all the
    supplies necessary before letting your loved one know it’s time to
    bathe and make sure the room is nice and warm so they are as
    comfortable as possible in and out of the water. Monitor the
    temperature of the bathing water at all times since your loved one
    may not be able to tell when it’s too hot or too cold.

    Invest in large beach towels for maximum privacy and warmth. To
    make rinsing easier, consider buying a hand held showerhead that
    reaches all around your bathtub. When assisting your loved one in
    the bath, instruct them or let them help do small tasks, such as
    holding a washcloth or the soap while you rinse the shampoo out of
    his or her hair, so they feel involved and more in control. Be
    supportive and offer your loved one a choice of whether they’d like
    to take a bath or shower. If he or she is resists bathing or acts
    out aggressively, distract them and try the process again later
    when they’re feeling a little less vulnerable.

    Schedule a bathing time each day so that your loved one knows what
    to expect and isn’t so frightened of or unfamiliar with the
    process. Make sure that each part of his or her body is washed
    thoroughly and then dried after to avoid any rashes or other skin
    problems that often arise on people with Alzheimer’s. Apply lotion
    or baby powder after bathing so that their skin stays soft and
    double check for sores or rashes each day.

    For more tips for caregivers check out http://www.simplesite.com/Marcus/7889610

  • April 20, 2010 at 8:42 pm

    My dad went through some very strange changes. He would wake up a dozen times a night because his brain was telling him he needed the toilet. He would get locked in cycles or actions that would often be in the wrong order. Sometimes the changes can be quite distressing and stressful. The main and sometimes hardest thing to do is to remember that they’re not doing it on purpose. It can be really hard not to take these things personally when your tired and overwhelmed.

  • April 21, 2010 at 1:15 pm

    Let me tell you what works for me! That whole shower thing is major input to our brains….all of our senses are being inundated!!!
    Earplugs soften the noise of the water. I step into the tub at the far end, away from the shower head. Then sitting on a shower stool, I can just stick one piece of me at a time under the water. My brain can still function enough usually that I can figure out how to turn the water off. I’m thinking when I can’t do this by myself, a towel can cover me to preserve some of my modesty. Worth a shot, I’m thinking!

  • April 23, 2010 at 6:57 pm

    Hi. I’m new to this site, but hope I can be of some help and find some help here. My husband can still shower alone, but often forgets that I have put everything he needs right within easy reach. He may come out looking for soap or shampoo or a towel. The other day he came out of the bathroom 3 times with just his underwear on. I kept taking him back in and pointing out the pajamas hanging on a hook.

    I want to show him respect and provide him privacy for as long as possible, but I guess it is time for me to stay in there with him. Our hot water has been turned down enough that he can’t be scalded, but he probably needs help with washing if he can’t recognize the body wash and shampoo. (He puts stick deodorant on his face instead of after shave.)

  • April 24, 2010 at 8:50 pm

    Bathing is often the most difficult personal care activity that caregivers face. Because it is such an intimate experience, people with dementia may perceive it as unpleasant or threatening. In turn, they may act in disruptive ways, like screaming, resisting or hitting.
    Such behavior often occurs because the person doesn’t remember what bathing is for or doesn’t have the patience to endure such unpleasant parts of the task like lack of modesty, being cold or other discomforts. Here are some tips to make bathing the person with dementia easier.
    http://www.alz.org/documents/national/topicsheet_bathing.pdf

  • June 17, 2010 at 5:20 pm

    When people get old, we send them to a nursing home for professional care and comfort. A nursing home is a long-term care facility licensed by the state that offers 24-hour room and board and health care services, including basic and skilled nursing care, rehabilitation, and a full range of other therapies, treatments, and programs. People who live in nursing homes are referred to as residents.
    I know its difficult decision to put a loved on into a nursing home can be difficult under the best of circumstances. Nursing homes are often the only alternative for patients who require nursing care over an extended period of time. They are too ill to remain at home, with families, or in less structured long-term facilities.
    nursing home compare

  • June 17, 2010 at 5:21 pm

    When people get old, we send them to a nursing home for professional care and comfort. A nursing home is a long-term care facility licensed by the state that offers 24-hour room and board and health care services, including basic and skilled nursing care, rehabilitation, and a full range of other therapies, treatments, and programs. People who live in nursing homes are referred to as residents.
    I know its difficult decision to put a loved on into a nursing home can be difficult under the best of circumstances. Nursing homes are often the only alternative for patients who require nursing care over an extended period of time. They are too ill to remain at home, with families, or in less structured long-term facilities.
    nursing home compare

  • June 17, 2010 at 5:22 pm

    When people get old, we send them to a nursing home for professional care and comfort. A nursing home is a long-term care facility licensed by the state that offers 24-hour room and board and health care services, including basic and skilled nursing care, rehabilitation, and a full range of other therapies, treatments, and programs. People who live in nursing homes are referred to as residents.
    I know its difficult decision to put a loved on into a nursing home can be difficult under the best of circumstances. Nursing homes are often the only alternative for patients who require nursing care over an extended period of time. They are too ill to remain at home, with families, or in less structured long-term facilities.
    nursing home compare

  • June 18, 2010 at 5:18 pm

    @jesiline wrote:

    When people get old, we send them to a nursing home for professional care and comfort. A nursing home is a long-term care facility licensed by the state that offers 24-hour room and board and health care services, including basic and skilled nursing care, rehabilitation, and a full range of other therapies, treatments, and programs

    WOW that is very presumptous. My mother is 96.5 and fortunately I did not have to place her in a facility and I live with her at home. Currently she is nearing the end of her life and is on hospice.
    She has not been able to do anything for years. She hasn’t known me or anyone, including herself for years.
    I bathe her, do all her bathroom hygiene, etc.
    That is my situation.

    But to say that we send old people to facilities automatically is wrong.

      They either come live with us.
      We live with them.
      Or they are placed in an assisted living home, residential care home or nursing home.

    But the choice is whatever works best for everyone concerned.

    To OP, Alzheimers is permanent, progressive brain damage. So angry behaviors, odd behaviors and inabilities to do normal tasks, is all part of it.