• March 25, 2019 at 12:17 pm

    Providing care for a spouse, or any loved one with Alzheimer’s can be a lonely job. As connections once enjoyed with the patient fade, other relationships often suffer as well from a lack of time and attention.

    It’s okay to feel lonely, angry, scared and other uncomfortable things. It’s also okay to want to be happy. Maintaining supportive relationships outside of your caregiving duties gives you someone to share your feelings with, good and bad. And that can bring stress levels down.

    Do Something—With Friends

    Make it a priority to spend time in the company of others:

    • Join a support group (in-person or online) to talk about daily challenges.
    • Sign up for a club, team or class to meet others who share your interests.
    • Make plans with someone who makes you laugh. You need it!
    • If you can’t get out, invite a friend to visit. Your loved one may enjoy the change of pace, too.

    If you’re a caregiver and dealing with loneliness, what are some ways you are trying to relieve the stress?

  • January 18, 2022 at 9:48 am

    Thank you for this useful sharing. Your writing is not the only solution for me, it soothes me and makes me feel understood. I will try the tips you shared and share with you the changes I have. Thank a lot.
    krunkerio

  • January 20, 2022 at 4:35 am

    Thank you for posting this. I believe this will truly help and make my life easier. I’m having these issues once in a while, but I will try to avoid them.