• October 8, 2011 at 4:45 pm

    When you’re trying to keep you loved one in his or her home—or in your home—the nagging question always seems to center on the issue of safety. “When is it no longer safe to leave my loved one at home alone?” The question may not be about moving your loved one to a care facility, but may involve deciding to bring in full-time help.
    There are lots of safety check lists you can use, and if you want a long version, please send me an email at caregivingcoach@ymail.com and I’ll be happy to send you a detailed 13-question list for you to ponder.
    On the other hand, here’s a short-cut method of making the determination as to when it’s time to move into a new mode of care:
    We’ve all been in more than one relationship in our lives. Think back to when you were dating someone seriously, but you could feel that the relationship wasn’t going well.
    There was a rule of thumb that covered that circumstance, which was: “if you’ve been thinking about breaking up, then you’ve already made the decision to break up.”
    The same hold true in caregiving. If you’ve been thinking about moving your loved one to a care facility or hiring full-time help, then you’ve reached the point where that’s what you need to do. It will not be easy, but delaying only makes it more difficult and makes safety concerns for your loved one more acute.
    For information on what the choices are, and some suggestions for taking the next steps, you can find lots of help in Paul and Lori Hogan’s book, The Stages of Senior Care.
    Blessings, Joanne

  • October 11, 2011 at 7:37 am

    help services are provided in order to assist people to remain in their own home and to avoid going in to long-term care. However, your Local Health Office is not legally obliged to provide these services. In practice, the HSE either provides the home help service directly or make arrangements with voluntary organisations to provide them.

    The service is generally free to medical card holders and is always free to people who have contracted Hepatitis C directly or indirectly from the use of Human Immunoglobulin-Anti-D or from the receipt within Ireland of another blood product or a blood transfusion and who have a Health Amendment Act Card. Other people may be asked to make a contribution to the cost of the service.

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