• August 25, 2011 at 3:58 am

    http://alzheimers.about.com/od/advocates/a/bill_of_rights.htm
    A formalized caregivers Bill of Rights provides balance and asserts that all individuals have needs that have to be fulfilled. I believe this example of a caregivers bill of rights by Wendy Lustbader captures the core values very well.

    ❓ Wendy Lustbader, M.S.W. , is a mental health counselor at Pike Market Medical Clinic in Seattle and affiliate assistant professor at the University of Washington School of Social Work. She also lectures nationally on topics related to chronic illness, aging, and the needs of family caregivers. She is the co-author of Taking Care of Aging Family Members: A Practical Guide and author of Counting on Kindness: The Dilemmas of Dependency, both published by the Free Press.

  • December 14, 2010 at 6:44 am

    The 10 Absolutes

    Never ARGUE, instead AGREE

    Never REASON, instead DIVERT

    Never SHAME, instead DISTRACT

    Never LECTURE, instead REASSURE

    Never say REMEMBER, instead REMINISCE

    Never say I TOLD YOU, instead REPEAT

    Never say YOU CAN’T, instead say DO WHAT YOU CAN

    Never COMMAND, or DEMAND, instead ASK or MODEL

    Never CONDESCEND, instead ENCOURAGE and PRAISE

    Never FORCE, instead REINFORCE

  • August 6, 2010 at 6:01 pm

    I went to his profile page and shared your post. Maybe we will hear from him soon.

  • July 30, 2010 at 7:06 am

    My initial post about lithium aspartate was March 17 2008
    http://www.alzinfo.org/forum/viewtopic.php?t=27
    and I tried to link to my source but since it was an advertisement linked through my E~mail it did not work.I did say the link was not working.
    That was over 2 years ago,I had never heard about it so I did a little research and found the other article with the name of the author and I do give him the credit.
    Here is another one The Misunderstood Mineral — LITHIUM
    http://www.tahomaclinic.com/articles.shtml
    by Jonathan V. Wright, M.D.
    As far as my credibility,I am not making any claims here. I am just sharing this with others that might be interested and have not heard about it.Maybe I should go back and edit this post.
    Charles and fico says it works but they joined a year ago and posted on one subject.Are they for real or do they stand to profit?
    I do not know. I wish someone could say it worked for them and stay with us to prove it to us.
    I don’t know if I would try it or not.I would want to actually talk to Dr. Wright. What about liver damage or kidney damage?Would it be worth trying on someone in stage 6? I would do a whole lot more research before trying it,that is for sure.Let us know what you find out.

  • July 21, 2010 at 7:07 am

    No I am not kidding!I went to explain this to you and then I see I explained it already.What part of this don’t you get?
    They are losing their mind one cell at a time. They are losing the part of the mind that helps with “learning and reasoning”.”People must learn to deal with it”. You must step in and keep people from upsetting her. An upset, agitated demented person is harder to deal with than anything.If the imagined friends are upsetting her you must redirect her mind away from them. Reassure her that everything is okay.Keep her calm. Keep notes to show her doctor. Sometimes they can adjust or add medication that helps.Do not allow people to argue. Simply say her arguing days are over. How can you reason with someone that has lost that ability.You can not win. She will just become a bear to deal with. You need her calm and happy.Be kind to her. Defend her! Comfort her. Respect her.Love her.
    It’s not like you can whip them and they will say “oh okay I will learn not to do that again!”

  • July 21, 2010 at 6:51 am

    Hey Bob,
    First of all, Has your wife been diagnosed with dementia. If not she needs to be diagnosed and put on medication.The sooner the better.
    I had the same with my Mom. So I went to the bank by myself and explained the situation to a teller. She had me talk to one of her bosses at the desk. The boss said bring her in and she would ease my Mom’s worries. Then she made a point of telling my Mom to have Me call whenever she wants her to check her account to make sure everything is A~Okay.So when Mom would be worried about her account I could call and make sure it was okay but then the second and third and fourth time I was actually calling my sister and talking to her.A few times my Mom would want to ask about it herself so she would talk to my sister thinking it was the lady at the bank.We in the “industry”call this therapudic fibbing.
    Seriously though folks…we are just at wits end caregivers just like you.
    Hey Jon,We suggest what seems to work for us and others. If it doesn’t work for you,then what?Keep trying until you find something that works for you and then share it with us. No one has this all figured out.No one can answer all of your questions. Maybe you can answer a few of theirs.

  • June 28, 2010 at 9:12 pm

    They are losing their mind one cell at a time. They are losing the part of the mind that helps with learning and reasoning.People must learn to deal with it. You must step in and keep people from upsetting her. An upset, agitated demented person is harder to deal with than anything.If the imagined friends are upsetting her you must redirect her mind away from them. Reassure her that everything is okay.Keep her calm. Keep notes to show her doctor. Sometimes they can adjust or add medication that helps.Do not allow people to argue. Simply say her arguing days are over. How can you reason with someone that has lost that ability.You can not win. She will just become a bear to deal with. You need her calm and happy.Be kind to her. Defend her! Comfort her. Respect her.Love her.
    http://www.alzheimers.org.au/content.cfm?topicid=62
    The 10 Absolutes

    Never ARGUE, instead AGREE
    Never REASON, instead DIVERT
    Never SHAME, instead DISTRACT
    Never LECTURE, instead REASSURE
    Never say REMEMBER, instead REMINISCE
    Never say I TOLD YOU, instead REPEAT
    Never say YOU CAN’T,instead say DO WHAT YOU CAN
    Never COMMAND, or DEMAND, instead ASK or MODEL
    Never CONDESCEND, instead ENCOURAGE and PRAISE
    Never FORCE, instead REINFORCE
    http://alzheimers.infopop.cc/eve/forums/a/tpc/f/204109581/m/213107532?r=403303104#403303104

  • June 27, 2010 at 3:13 am

    Welcome Check out the chat rooms.
    They are people who are going through the same or have been there before. They will have some good advice and support.

  • June 16, 2010 at 6:18 am

    Thank You for sharing. Yes, It is a sweet story.

  • May 13, 2010 at 1:06 pm

    What is the question?You can post a question here and get advice. You can check out the chat room and go to a scheduled chat and ask questions.You can go to the Alzheimer’s Association’s website message board http://alzheimers.infopop.cc/eve and ask questions or to their chat room http://alzheimers.infopop.cc/eve/chime and ask questions or you could call their 24/7 Hot line and ask questions.The number is 1-800-272-3900.You can ask questions on my profile page and I will answer.Or if it is too personal you can become my friend on here and send a message that is between you and I.Or if you find someone on here you can send them a friend request,if they accept it,you will be able to ask them questions in a message to them. Hope to see you in chat some day.

  • May 9, 2010 at 10:02 pm

    The only thing I have seen on lithium aspartate or lithium orotate is a forum entry I started to see if anyone was interested in it and maybe do some research and sharing the results. http://www.alzinfo.org/forum/viewtopic.php?t=27

    I would ask the Doctor that wrote the article. Dr. Howenstine can be reached at jimhow@racsa.co.cr and by mail at Dr. James Howenstine, C/O Remarsa USA SB 37, P.O. Box 25292, Miami, Fl. 33102-5292.

    Personally I would stay with the Namenda and see about adding Aricept.
    Please let us know what you find out and decide and how it works out.

  • April 24, 2010 at 8:50 pm

    Bathing is often the most difficult personal care activity that caregivers face. Because it is such an intimate experience, people with dementia may perceive it as unpleasant or threatening. In turn, they may act in disruptive ways, like screaming, resisting or hitting.
    Such behavior often occurs because the person doesn’t remember what bathing is for or doesn’t have the patience to endure such unpleasant parts of the task like lack of modesty, being cold or other discomforts. Here are some tips to make bathing the person with dementia easier.
    http://www.alz.org/documents/national/topicsheet_bathing.pdf

  • April 10, 2010 at 7:20 am

    Welcome…Keeping notes to show to her doctor is a good idea. There are medications that can help with the behaviors and sleep changes associated to dementia.
    Lifestyle Measures May Promote Sound Sleep in Alzheimer’s
    http://www.alzinfo.org/newsarticle/templates/archivenewstemplate.asp?articleid=90&zoneid=6

    Treatments for Sleep Changes
    http://www.alz.org/alzheimers_disease_10429.asp

    And this link is the best I’ve found for helping you cope with all of the behavior changes due to dementia.
    http://www.alzheimers.org.au/content.cfm?topicid=62

    Jim’s blog is worth the read.It’s not really that long.I’ve read it all a few times. It’s a wonderful love story.

  • March 19, 2010 at 5:53 am

    Mom after over dosing on all of her “Take as needed” pills.
    Well I needed them or the Doctor would not have given them to me!

  • March 18, 2010 at 7:43 am

    Welcome Snaxie…My mother was just like your mother diagnosed with Mild Alzheimers progressed very quickly to where she is hallucinating and some days does not recognise that she is in her own house. Turned out it was a UTI. (Urinary Tract Infection)..The Doctor gave her an antibotic and a Starter pack of Aricept and the hallucination stopped and she stopped packing to go home in 4 weeks.That was 3 years ago and now she has the mental ability she had 10 years ago with no hallucinations.
    Has your Mom been checked for a UTI.I have never seen an Alz Patient go from Mild to Servere in 3 months. I think it has happened but is rarer than not.Standard laboratory tests: might include blood and urine tests designed to help eliminate other possible conditions. These will measure things like blood count, thyroid and liver function, and levels of glucose and other blood-based indicators of illness. A depression screening should also be conducted. http://www.alzinfo.org/alzheimers-diagnosis.asp#3